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was a terrorist attack. but that isn't what the u.s. ambassador to the united nations susan rice said when she went on national television five days after the attack. today rice is up on capitol hill. she's explaining what happened and some big-name republicans clearly are not very happy with her answers. our senior congressional correspondent dana bash is following what's become a pretty long day -- a tiring day for the u.s. ambassador to the u.n. what's the latest, dana? >> reporter: wolf, the three republican senators who had vowed to block susan rice from being secretary of state if the president nominates her had really softened the rhetoric in recent days. i'm told the reason for that was because it was a curtesy in order for them to wait until they had a face-to-face meeting with her which was today. after that meeting their criticism was harsher than ever. the way these grim-faced gop senators tell it, susan rice's attempt to calm their criticism backfired. >> we are significantly troubled by many of the answers that we got and some that we didn't get. >> i'm more disturbed now than i
strong support for the ambassador. >> ambassador rice has done an excellent job for the united nations and is qualified for a number of positions in the foreign policy arena. i will leave it at that. >> president obama shows his support of susan rice as well. he had his first white house news conference after his election. the president took exception to republican senators critical of rice. if they want to come after any one they should come after me. >> kelly wright, thank you very much. senator lindsay graham is one of the three senators who have a lot of questions for ambassador rice. >> he gave us a preview of what he will be looking for during today's discussion. >> she asked to meet with us i will listen to what she has to say about her role in benghazi. the more i know about benghazi the more upset i am that the consulate was even open on september 11th. when you look at the history about the dangers we should never have been open or heavily reinforced. during the attack i am more core idea about how we couldn't help them for 7 hours. a spontaneous event caused by video turn nu
to the united nations. the un security council is set to meet on the situation in the middle east. this afternoon, israel and moscow agreed to a ceasefire which went into effect at 2:00 eastern this afternoon. looks like the security council meeting may be getting away momentarily and we will take you there live once it does. earlier this afternoon, and jesse jackson, representative from chicago, jesse jackson jr. submitted his resignation to speaker john boehner. nancy pelosi posted a statement saying it is of great sadness that we're learning of this decision. his service in congress is marked by as eloquent advocacy for his constituents abuse and his advocacy. that is from nancy pelosi and her statement on the resignation of jesse jackson jr. today. let's take you live now to the security council meeting at the united nations and the situation in the middle east, the conflict between israel and homospory this is a live look here on c- span. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] ba >> and the 6000 -- a me
. >>> israel is facing a setback at the united nations as france is announcing it plans to vote for palestinian statehood. the u.n. general assembly set to vote on this day after tomorrow on whether to recognize a palestinian state. france is the first major european country to announce it will support the resolution and analysts say the measure is likely to pass. israel and the united states said the only true path to statehood would involve a peace agreement with israel. this week's vote will also happen against the backdrop of a fragile cease fire between the israelis and their forces and the militants from hamas. >>> workers cracked open the grave today of the late palestinian leader yasser arafat. it's all part of an investigation into whether somebody poisoned him. assassinated him even. he died in 2004. what killed him is still officially a mystery. israel has denied poisoning him at all. but over the summer, a lab in switzerland detected traces of a radioactive material in stains on his clothing. the current palestinian leader authorized this investigation to determine once and for all
organizations and united nations looking at it to pinpoint what they're stopping and not stopping. of course, it is also the movement of people in and out. palestinians in and out of gaza. that will be lifted, as well. but it's put a real strangle hold on the economy of gaza and something people who live there want to be released. the concern from the israeli side is what's going in and what's going out and are they preventing arms going in and it's -- it's a complicated issue. as i say, they did agree to easing some of it but we don't know what that looks like in the next 24 hours. >> time will tell. stephanie, thank you. stay safe. jim frederick is joining me, international editor of "time" magazi magazine. here we are in to the cease-fire territory. talking 24 hours ago -- >> yeah. >> thinking it was going to happen at that point. but egypt is basically the tent pole in supporting this and sponsoring and overseeing the implementation of this. how much stability is this going to provide to the ongoing talks of trying to have a durable out come? >> i think this is a great first step. the ce
holliday the former u.s. ambassador for special political affairs to the united nations. he's currently the president and ceo of the meridian international center, which is a public diplomacy organization. ambassador let me start with the news of the shooting along the border between gas zba and israel. how troubling is an incident like this? and how perilous is it, really, for this fragile, fragile cease-fire? >> well, good morning. the local level, it's obviously very troubling, and there are, you know, lives at stake, and there's this delicate balance on the cease-fire. but in the bigger picture, this is -- there's a lot invested in this cease-fire, at the political level and it appears to be at this point more of the typical border incident category kind of problem rather than a directed violation from either side of the cease-fire. i think that's what we're going to have to watch for is what happens next. >> a lot of credit ins are looking at this agreement as a short-term fix, a band-aid that will last as long as, say, hamas manages to rearm and then perhaps start shooting rockets
in government circles. >> reporter: on his release, he will be given 34 lashes. this fall, the united nations human rights office declared that iranian authorities have embarked on a "severe clampdown" on journalists and human rights activists in a run-up to next june's iranian presidential elections. the iranian delegation to the u.n. dismissed the report as unfair and biased, and said the republic has worked wholeheartedly to realize the rights of its citizens. in an email to the newshour, the iranian u.n. mission claimed the report leveled "general allegations in the absence of authentic and reliable evidence aimed to serve propaganda." the communication also stated that political parties "enjoy the right of freedom of speech and free activities", and the iranians accused the u.s. of "a long list of gross and systematic violations of human rights, both at home and abroad." regime critics say they risk years in prison for their actions. abdolfattah soltani, an attorney and co-founder of the defenders of human rights center, tried to represent leaders of the minority b'hai faith. his daughte
questions have been answered. >> when you have a position where you'rer -- your ambassador to the united nations, you go well beyond unclassified talking points in your daily preparation and responsibilities for that job. and that's troubling to me, as well. >> all kisay, the concerns i have are greater today than they were before. and weare not even close to getting to the basic answers. >> did we find out anything from today's meeting? ambassador john bolton is here. your thoughts on the meeting with ambassador rice on capitol hill. >> from susan rice's point of view, this is a disaster, an opportunity to try to draw the sting out of the opposition that had been expressed by senator mccain and the others. obviously went in the opposite direction, when have you all three senator who is participated in the meeting, coming out after saying they have more questions now than they did before. this was a bad meeting, no doubt about it. i think part of the problem here is the continued focus by the white house, by susan rice, by people looking at it, on these so-called talk points that somebod
as the ambassador . united nations she reviewed more than that. >> in a written statement she knows that the intelligence that she based her sunday swars on is wrong and there no spontanous demonstration and saying while we wish we had had perfect information just days after the terrorist attack as is often the case inteleassessment evolve would and neither i nor anyone in the administration intended to mislead the american people in any stage in this progress. it all comes as a memo reveals that al-qaida was organized in september to carry out attack in tunisia and egypt and yephen well size libya. much of the focused on benghazi alone. these three embassy assaults deserve scut ninny and they are all connected to the al-qaida-led network. senator carl levin said it is not fair to hold her responsible for the original talking points since she did not produce them and the intelligence community stood by them. >> gretchen: there is no shock there. democrats will support susan rice. >> brian: i was stunned by yesterday. >> gretchen: this entire thing is a political football. this is wh
was approved, unanimously, or very strongly for her united nations position. to suggest that anyone is judging her on anything based other than on her record i think would be a big mistake, kirsten, i don't know what you think about that. >> clearly they've decided that that is the line of attack that they are going to take. have you have people like james klyburn, he's hardly a bit player,aying senator mccain is basically a racist for opposing her. it's demeaning to her. and she is a rhode scholar, a high ranking official even in the clinton administration. it's very demeaning to her to even do this. i think it's been set up that way. my point earlier was obama is emboldened by seeing that the media is just so complacent or stupid or whatever it is that they will not put together the pieces of how this story does not add up. it's so -- there are so many problems witness, but he thinks he can send the person up who he had be the face of benghazi, put her under oath and that it's not going to make any difference, it's not going to cause any problems for him says something either about his arrog
? ambassador is former ambassador to the united nations for special political affairs, are they better or worse now? >> they are in a process. president morsi's move was clearly an overreach. where they are now is negotiating a constitution. what opponents of morsi will say in shaping this constitution they will put in to place into effect a permanent of dominance for the muslim brotherhood. that is why they are so up in arms because they fought against mubarek for many years. >> gregg: isn't that what is happening here. he has usurped all power, he has pronounced these untouchables and new fair oh of egypt and they are calling him. tens of thousands have taken the street to denounce morsi and burning the offices of muslim brotherhood in two cities. where do you see this going, ambassador? >> there was broad support for mubarek after and many people in the streets of cairo and egypt think that the former regime got off lightly. with that said, i think there is a widespread ceiling they are entering a new phase in which the fundamental institutions and democratic protections are in jeopardy. tha
decisions until the country drafts a new constitution. some are now calling him a dictator and united nations say it raises human rights concerns. >>> first lady michelle obama will welcome the white house christmas tree. that's a look at last year's christmas tree. this year's will be a 19-foot christmas fir. it will arrive this morning from north carolina and ultimately will be displayed in the blue room. >> other thanksgiving tradition, triple serving of nfl football on thursday. it all started in detroit with te texans winning 34-31 in overtime. it was marred by controversy, a gaffe by lions coach jim schwartz who mistakenly threw the challenge flag on this touchdown. replay showed he was clearly down. if you challenge a scoring play, you're actually penalized. more importantly, you negate an automatic replay review. it's like a double whammy. i would expect that rule to be changed soon. it could have really caused -- probably did cost the lions the game. still the coach should have known better. >>> meantime in dallas cowboys lost to the washington redskins 38-31. rg3, robert gri
of the largest national organization of dreamers, united we dream. they will be planning their next effort, advocating for immigration reform legislation that will bring them and their families out of the shadows once and for all and give them a chance to earn their way to legal status and citizen thp in america. -- citizenship in america. one part of this immigration reform, the dream act is near and dear to me but i want to see comprehensive immigration reform before it is over. we know if we pass the dream act, it will help the economy, creating new jobs and economic growth when the talent of these young people, as they come out of high school and college is brought in our economy. in my home state of illinois, by 2030 the dream act will contribute $14 billion in economic activity, and dreamers would create up to 58,992 new jobs. i come to the floor to tell their stories. they used to hide in the shadows. they didn't want to talk about who they were because they were undocumented and afraid to be deported. many were deported. but i came to the floor to tell the stories of those who had
. >> thank you. >> coming up on c-span, live to new york city where the united nations security council is meeting to discuss the current middle east violence between israel and palestine. that is set for 330 eastern, again, on our companion network, c-span. tonight in prime time here on c-span2, author mark friedman discusses his new book, the big shift, navigating the new stage beyond midlife. he discusses how the baby boom generation is switching to new careers later in life. that begins at 8:00 p.m. eastern, again, here on c-span2. >> there are many people who might even take issue with grants saving the union during the civil war. didn't lincoln do that? well, yes, he did, and i'm not going to see grant was the only person to save the union, but he was the commanding general of the army's dumping of lincoln's policies into effect. he was the general who accepted the surrender of the army of northern virginia that ended the war. if anybody won the war on the battlefield, if you could say that any one person did, and of course you can't. one of the things we do in history is generali
to talk about. the defense budget is that about $800 billion a year. the united states commitment to the military budget is greater than the military budget of the next 10 highest military spending nations combined. those 10 nations together -- together spend about 50 -- 450 billion. we spent 800 billion. now here is the trick. our money is heavily invested in sophisticated military hardware. very sophisticated pieces of equipment, which truthfully impact our domestic economy. but the truth of the matter is the discussion about budgets from having put many, many budgets together is not a discussion just about money. it is a discussion about priorities and values. and we have to determine, you know, to me when you talk about what the deal is to be made, to sequester includes deep cuts in the military. and many on the right and mini and communities with error bars, military contractors that employ a lot of people will art in to avoid this military cuts. what we have to say is the nation as it is important that we prioritize education, infrastructure right alongside of trying to have
on immigration. here we go. michael graham. >> if you want a communist united states and work and make our nation better while making yourself better, come on! we've got legal immigration as marco said. if you're coming here because i want to live in america everything is free in america there's no country in the world says hey, send us your deadbeats so we can put them on the deadbeat dole as soon as they arrive. it is a crazy message. it is a slap in the face to the millions and millions of legal immigrants who come here, work and then their tax dollars go to pay bums to live off of our system. >> stephanie: at least he has a soothing tone of voice. >> how come everybody is so yelly today? >> stephanie: i don't know. >> because romney lost black guy in the white house! [ ♪ "jeopardy" theme ♪ ] >> stephanie: who said pakistanis fight against indians. greeks and turks and palestinians. different cultures fight over ethnic and geographic grudges from the past. here in america, they come together to build a future
, the campaign to fix the national debt. and a petition filed by residents to secede from the united states. washington journal, with your phone calls, tweets, and e- mail's. >> we can remember barack obama's speech in 2004, the dazzling masterpiece that instantly makes him a national figure and four years later, the most honorable candidate for the presidency. lincoln is a dazzling speech in new york, it is a beautiful testament to the quality of his mind, the research he does, the logical argument. when he runs for the set that, barack obama gave the speech in 2004 running for the senate in illinois. abraham lincoln ran for the senate in illinois and he lost. if you want to think about abraham lincoln in 1860, think about barack obama running for the presidency in 2008. if he had lost the senate election, that is the level of national maturity we are talking about here. >> profiling historic and modern leaders to show the lessons that can be learned from those that have had the greatest impact on the issues of their time. sunday at 9:00 p.m. and midnight eastern part of the holiday weeken
and around the nation took due note that something big was happening in texas. the new york times reported that president love it had attracted an array of the learning such as had seldom been assembled in the united states. another paper waxed mystically and observed that the president's speech coincided with the early evening appearance of both jupiter and venus and suggested that the evening sky was an all glory of a bright future for the institute. not every newspaper was as perceptive or trance jed -- transcended. one local journal reported the founding of rice in the same column that the news that congo, the largest circus elephant, was coming to town. as i said i will keep my remarks a great great great deal shorter, but i would like to close with a personal word of congratulations to the president on having the privilege to serve at rice during its centennial. i am delighted to have the opportunity to call him president once again. any of you who have been to supreme court note that the justices on that court are used to asking lawyers a lot of question period today we will turn th
to fix the national debt. then in the depositions to secede from the united states. we are joined by a georgetown university law professor. washington journal, live starting at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. but what soldiers now placed on century duty on the road in and out of boston and on guard outside the homes, officials and with british artillery now aimed at the town house of the general court, it is easy to understand why many boston residents felt threatened by the occupation. many he is how some soldiers try to stir up racial tensions in their town. not everyone in boston is white. for instance, with an -- within a month and there are rival, three british officers had been discovered encouraging some african american slaves in boston to attack their white masters. one of the stock officers assured these black bostonians that the soldiers were there to procure their freedom and that with their help and assistance, we should be able to drive all the liberty bowl is to the devil. while that slaves he talked to ignore these lies, the british army was not there to free the slav
believed -- lincoln fully believed if there were two nations in the middle of the north american continent, this war would not be the last. they said the reason the united states had not been written by the wars that affected europe for centuries was there was a single country. once there are two countries in north america, they will go at it again so this war would not be the last and in the long run even 600,000 lives, this might be a bargaining human suffering. >> questions from the audience? we will start over here. [inaudible] >> is there a microphone he could use? i am sorry. >> is the microphone working? good deal. we are all talking, we were wondering when you were going to get to the part about what we all believe in the southern part of the united states, how he was a drunk and a corrupt politician. you are contradicting much of that. you came to different conclusions, did you? >> i did the. i will give you grant's reputation. for years he was a drunk and a butcher and his administration was one of the most corrupt in american history. historians rating presidents until the begin
used increasingly by law enforcement officials in the united states. host: mike lyons is a national security analyst. he served in the army and finished his career as executive officer to the deputy chief of staff for operations in the netherlands >>. leah is the next caller. caller: week received a grant money so the police could learn to do surveillance. they are coming into the neighborhoods. they are bringing the drones close to the roof levels banging the roofs causing sleep deprivation. there is no oversight. homeland security never set the committee a up. there is also a problem with health. when you use electromagnetic close to a person, it changes the charge of the cells that causes disease. host: what about the possible health impacts? guest: if you listened to any of the cable networks during the fighting in gaza over the past weeks, you heard that the sound of the unmanned vehicles. it is designed to be used positively to look at traffic patterns. it is designed to be used in ways to help the community. in fact, the crash. they create noise. those things are not consider
to bring that forward. the diplomatic industrial and economic pieces of strategy of united states and for other countries are parts that are used to put forth those pieces that are best for those nations. however, there are some governments that do not and will not adhere to those things in the interest of the united states. if that is the case, we have to have places where we can bring troops into at a moment's notice or in a short period of time and ordered to be able to, when necessary, put forth military pace. host: you would be against the drawing down some of these bases around the world? caller: i agree that some of them are unnecessary. the military has taken that into account but i am listening to the ones she is talking about and i think that is not exactly the majority. host: which ones in particular are you concerned about with regard to countries? caller: places like japan. the base in germany, i could probably agree with that. in japan, you have a force of their in north korea. north korea is not a force that people should take lightly. guest: thank you, i think ther
? >>heather: and a possible huge change in united states defense policy amid turnover in personal. owe new faces could impact our national security. d states. the only time i've ever had a break is when i was on maternity leave. i have retired from doing this one thing that i loved. now, i'm going to be able to have the time to explore something different. it's like another chapter. [ male announcer ] it's that time of year again. medicare open enrollment. time to compare plans and costs. you don't have to make changes. but it never hurts to see if you can find better coverage, save money, or both. and check out the preventive benefits you get after the health care law. ♪ open enrollment ends dember 7th. so now's the time. visit care.gov or call 1-800-medicare. >>gregg: time now for the top of the news. egypt's stock market taking a tumble after president morsi's taking a power grab possibly sending egypt's troubled economy into trouble. >>heather: and $27 billion needed to clean up after hurricane sandy and will go to hiring more than 5,000 unemployed people in new york. >>gregg: strong
solution to the problem. so i think with so many he could have united the people of good will to address this problem and that polarized the nation and was the beginning of polarization that would never end until a civil war. >> if we could bring john quincy adams to the day, what do you think he would like and not like america in 2012? >> he would despise our involvement overseas. our attempt to dictate to society's the kind of society as they have to have. when he had the opportunity as the secretary of state to intervene, monroe would have done whatever he could in the pro-democracy movement so to speak he pointed out that these people have no history of self-government. religiously or politically they had never been exposed to self-government. their political culture and family culture did not tolerate. he said this is a lost cause we must not involve ourselves and said he would not involve us in trying to change the culture of the people in the middle east. these are people with no history, no political history or religious history of self governance. they don't know what it means.
, quote, peacefully grant the state of texas to withdraw from the united states of america and create its own new government. as "the washington post" dana milbank put it in a recent column f obama were serious about being a good steward of the nation's finances, he would let them go. did you hear that? because many of those states are what dana milbank said are government takers, they take more in federal money than they pay in taxes. alabama gets $1.71 from the federal government for every $1 paid in taxes. louisiana gets $1.45 in federal aid for every $1 they pay in taxes. author of "bush's brain," and james braxton peterson associate professor of english at lehigh, and michael steele, former chair of the rnc and a political analyst here at msnbc. gentlemen, this is an extraordinary thing but let's talk about this, professor peterson, recent "daily beast" article you talked about using maps in 1859 to america today where states are petitioning to secede following obama's election. you write they were pro-slavery or open to slavery. this same collective of states were required to be rac
, and when you go around the world before 9-11, and you ask what they thought of the united , they admire the united states. they looked at the united states as the plays that could pull a rabbit out of i have and reinvent itself. they see a nation constrained , overreaching.mo we talked to tim geithner. can you tell other economies what to do? it has been limited. when you look at barack obama's meeting in london when the global economy was on fire, it is interesting. she laid down the gauntlet we are not going to play by the rules. it has been interesting to look at the limits we have influencing a nation like germany. i asked you, do you think america can influence the international system? i would love to see how you see the challenges ahead and put them in a geostrategic all context. >> i think it is as important as a strong military. i think economics is an answer of rebates as important as traditional policy. i think we have moved from an era where rates are the measure of a nation's strength or vulnerability to an era where sovereign interest rates are a measure of strength or vul
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the national defense he headquarters. israeli police confirm that an explosive device detonated but say it was not a suicide attack. the white house is calling the attack against israeli civilians outrage o outrageous. the united kingdom is condemning the, quote, shocking violence. the eight-day conflict between israel and hamas has claimed the lives of more than 130 palestinians and five israelis. despite hopes of a ceasefire, tuesday ended as the conflict's deadliest day. secretary clinton who rushed to the region to try to prevent an escalation of the conflict is in cairo to meet with egyptian president mohamed morsi who is key to brokering any deal. it's her final stop on an emergency round of shuttle diplomacy that also include meetings in israel and the west bank. for the latest nbc's stephanie gosk joins us and ayman mohyeldin. a report of a tel aviv bus explosion. is there any indication that the israelis now are looking at possibly having a short-term truce or want to hold out long er for a longer deal? >> reporter: well, we don't have a truce. there's a lot of talk yesterday t
of strategy for the united states and for other countries are parts that are used to i guess put forth those pieces that are the best for those nations, for their interest. however, there are some governments that do not and will not adhere to those things that are within the interest of the united states. if that is the case, then we have to have places that we can bring troops into at a moments notice and in a short period of time in order to be able when necessary to put forth a military piece. >> host: so you are against drawing down some of these bases around the world? >> caller: i would say i agree, some of them are unnecessary and the military has taken that into account but i'm listening to the ones that she is talking about and i'm going, that is not exactly -- >> host: which ones in particular are you concerned about? >> caller: i was listening to her talk about japan and the base in germany, i agreed. the military has looked at and taken account germany. you have a -- in north korea. north korea is not a place that people should take lightly. >> guest: thanks, kevin. there are a
pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the presiding officer: the clerk will read a communication to the senate. the clerk: washington, d.c, november 27, 2012. to the senate: under the provisions of rule 1, paragraph 3, of the standing rules of the senate, i hereby appoint the honorable christopher a. coons, a senator from the state of delaware, to perform the duties of the chai. signed: daniel k. inouye, president pro tempore. mr. reid: mr. president? the presiding officer: the majority leader. mr. reid: i now move to proceed to calendar number 419, s. 3254, the defense authorization bill. the presiding officer: the clerk will report. the clerk: motion to proceed to calendar number 419, s. 3254, a bill to authorize aeption prosecutes for fiscal year 2013 for military activities in the department of defense and so forth and for other purposes. mr. reid: we're going to recess, as we normally do on tuesdays, from 12:30 to 2:15 to allow for our weekly caucu
to the flag. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america, and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the presiding officer: the clerk will read a communication to the senate. the clerk: washington, d.c., november 26, 2012 to the senate: under the provisions of rule 1, paragraph 3, of the standing rules of the senate, i hereby appoint the honorable richard blumenthal, a senator from the state of connecticut, to perform the duties of the chair. signed: daniel k. inouye, president pro tempore. mr. reid: mr. president? the presiding officer: the majority leader. mr. reid: i note the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: mr. reid: mr. president? the presiding officer: the majority leader. mr. reid: at 5:30 today, all postcloture time on s. 3525 on the sportsmen's act will have expired. there will be two roll call votes at that time. the first vote will be on a motion to waive the budget act, and the second will be on passage of the bill as amended. mr. presiden
important goals, the united states is moving towards the end of the longest sustained armed conflict in the nation's history, and i would also like to take a moment to express my pride in the men and women in uniform who have fought throughout that period, putting their lives on line to protect this country. were it not for their sacrifices, were in not for their willingness to do that, we would not be able to accomplish what we have. thank god they are there. [applause] one thing i found out when i came from the cia to the defense department, i have a lot of great joy is. i have got great weapons, a great ships, great plains, great technologies, but none of that would be worth anything without the good men and women in uniform that serve this country and did it take their lives to protecting this country. that is the real strength of the united states of america. as we transition into this new era, we will have to look at important priorities that will take on a greater urgency, particularly as we looked at the second term of this administration and look at what are the challenges w
barely even noticed it. i mention that because journalism is frequently affected by national interest. to the degree the perception of what happened in the congo is less important than what happens in the united states, we do not cover it. we are engaged by what happens syria, but i do not know if shed a great deal of light. i know you began by asking what is happening in gaza and what i think about that. >> yes. >> any time israel is involved in a story, did becomes excruciatingly -- id becomes excruciatingly difficult to cover, because there is a sense of identity in this country with israelis, and many reporters, old friends and colleagues of mine used to be criticized for taking an anti- israeli point of view. he spent many years living in the arab world and had a sympathetic. of view to arabs. -- point of view to arabs. i think what is happening in gaza right now meets in the definition of tragedy. the israelis cannot be expected to stand by while their cities are rocketed. on the other hand, the idea that the israeli defense forces are equally professional, the number of casualt
of the nation's most respected judges, legal scholars, lawyers, and policy analysts. the marquee event is tonight's program. the namesake of tonight's lecturer became the youngest associate justice ever to serve on united states supreme court when he was appointed by president madison in 1812. he made a significant mark on american law in his 33 years on the bench, but his greatest contribution is is renowned commentaries on the constitution. justice story a famously and correctly declared "a constitutional government is addressed to the common sense of the people and never was designed for trials of logical skills or visionary speculation." this lecture series celebrates his legacy in the law. prior lectures have been judge robert bork, professor john harrison, judge raymond randolph, and chief justice of the united states court of appeals of the sixth circuit. tonight, we're honored to add a fifth name to that prestigious list as a welcome justice anthony kennedy. justice kennedy received his bachelor of arts degree from stanford university and the london school of economics and his
so weaken the nation, that it would be very, very prone to of foreign involvement, the british were still in canada, obviously. there were certainly foreign threats that are weakened and divided united states would have been prone to. on to the second question, which is about social media and lincoln. first of all, there was plenty of social media in 1861-1865 because it was the era in which mass communications was available. the telegraph, the railroad, the newspaper or all becoming much more prevalent. many more americans were littered and reading newspapers, so people were seeing and hearing about the carnage of the war every single day. the telegraph offices would be filled with the casualty report. the other thing that changed very, very radically was that this was also the first american war that was photographed, and people were seeing photographs of the carnage. the new york times in a very, very famous review of mathew brady studio putting up a display of war scenes said that the photograph had brought the war into living rooms. so i think that certainly wasn't as prevalent
a commission in the united states navy as a public affairs officer. her support of the military goes far beyond that of the service of her sons. dr. biden has co-sponsored with our first lady, michelle obama, the national initiative joining forces, providing support and expanding opportunities for veterans and active duty personnel and their families. that exemplifies the commitment to those who serve and who have served, and the strength of character of jill biden and of her home, the first state. i know delaware's citizens will honor their state's namesake, follow her as she comes to life in a few years and embrace those who sail in her for decades to come as she in turn honors the first state's legacy, and she sails the seas in defense of our nation and upholding her state's motto: freedom and liberty. and the navy motto, forever courageous. now, it's my happy privilege to introduce the sponsor of the uss delaware, dr. jill biden. [applause] >> thank you, secretary maybus, for that kind introduction. this is a very exciting day. as a proud military mom and a very delawarean, i am honored to
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